Nature’s Balm

Back-lit Insect

bathe in pure sunlight

nature’s balm upon your skin

reviving your soul

Advertisements

Changing Seasons: August 2017

Meadow at Dawn

Grasses have ripened into swathes of gold,

and leaves have deepened their colour in maturity,

for the meadow and woodland have passed their peak,

accepting the inevitability of the ageing year.

 

It’s been a few months since I last joined in with Cardinal Guzman’s Changing Seasons photo challenge, but I thought that, seeing as I’ve still been visiting the meadow and wooded area despite moving away, I may as well post the pictures I’ve taken. As I no longer live in the village, my visits haven’t been as frequent as they were in earlier months – which mainly means that this post was far easier to put together. I only had a few dozen pictures to sort through, rather than a few hundred!

If you’d like to see what was happening in the meadow at other times of the year, please check out the Changing Seasons category at the top of the page.

thechangingseasons_6367

The Indian Bean Tree

Tree House

seek shelter

beneath broad leaves

find renewal


I’ve loved the tree house tree from the moment we moved into our new house. At first, though, we had no idea what sort of tree it actually was. Generally, I’d simply admire the way the evening light lit the leaves.

During July, however, we were given a few more clues to its identity. Blossom! At first it looked like a popcorn tree as white buds exploded into existence. Soon these buds opened up and covered the tree with beautiful white blossoms. A Google search for July flowering trees allowed us to finally identify it as a Catalpa, or Indian Bean Tree. This is actually a type of tree native to the Eastern United States and introduced to the UK in 1726. They’re not particularly long lived – the oldest known UK specimen is a 150-year-old in a Reading churchyard. As they take 20-50 years to reach their full growth of 10-15 meters, I’d say that ours is possibly now in, or at least nearing, its later years.

I’m now in my final few days of CampNaNoWriMo, with only a last few thousand words to write, so hopefully I’ll be back to a more complete blogging schedule soon.

As the Wisteria Grows

Green Man Close Up 2

you could

simply watch through weary

eyes as an ever-changing world

ebbs and flows

*

or you could

keep on stretching fearlessly

higher refusing to accept

defeat

Green Man on Pagoda

When my sister and I moved in to our new house, there was a pagoda in the garden that was barely standing beneath the weight of dead wisteria branches. We cut the wisteria back until all that remained was a stump with a couple of green shoots. These we decided to leave, hoping it would make a comeback. We then replaced several rotten pagoda posts and found the perfect place to hang the green man wall plaque.

We’re now considering whether or not to move the green man. The wisteria has definitely made a comeback! Those little shoots didn’t take long to grow, or to multiply, and they quickly tangled themselves around the post all the way up to the top. We worked out that they’re growing at a rate of six inches a day! When the photo was taken I was lucky enough to go into the garden when one of the shoots had tucked its tip into the green man’s mouth. Needless to say, it didn’t stay there long. At this rate, the whole pagoda will be covered again in wisteria soon, and, if he stays there, the green man will be well and truly hidden.


This post is for the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge. This week’s theme is Delta, and we’re asked to share a picture that symbolizes transitions, change, and the passing of time.

CB&W: B is for… Boundaries

Dead Hedging

boundary lines marked

containing Earth’s wild spaces

guardianship claimed

Meadow Fence.jpg

This post is for Cee’s Black and White Challenge. This week’s theme is Letters A or B, and I decided to show pictures of some of the boundaries of the meadow and wooded area.

Woodland Fence

Both the first and last pictures show newly erected boundaries, as management of the wooded area has recently been taken on by the same couple – Kate and Ollie – who own the meadow. They’ve been putting in a lot of work to regenerate the area. The first picture shows a stretch of dead hedging, created from branches and other foliage gathered during pruning. This type of hedging provides habitat for insects, birds and animals, whilst also providing a barrier that blends far more naturally into the landscape than a fence. The gate in the final picture below takes you through onto their own land next door. I’ve been invited to go through the gate to photograph around their pond, though I haven’t done so yet.

Gate

I hope you like the pictures.

black-white-banner

 

WPC: Solitary Watcher

jackdaw-2

lonely gaze watches

abandoned to solitude

awaiting friendship


This post is for the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge. This week’s prompt is solitude.

I photographed this jackdaw when we were in Cornwall last summer. It was sitting all on its own in a tree in the middle of Tintagel village. Jackdaws are very social creatures, seen more often in groups than on their own, so I thought of it as soon as I saw this week’s prompt.

My internet connection is still very hit and miss at the moment. The last several days I’ve been told it’s been great during the daytime while I’ve been at work. Unfortunately it’s been abysmal each evening after I’ve arrived home. Grr. It took ages to upload this picture, and I’ve had the message ‘saving of draft failed’ flashing up on my screen every few minutes while I’ve been putting together the rest of the post. I’m now just hoping that I manage to get an internet connection long enough to actually post it! I’ll respond to comments, and visit everyone’s blogs as soon as I can, but, as you can probably guess, commenting is very frustrating when you have to type the comment several dozen times before it sends.