Allergic to ‘E’ Challenge

I’ve been nominated to take part in the Allergic to ‘E’ Challenge by Prakash Hegard of It’s PH. Thank you very much for the nomination. I couldn’t resist taking part…

Here are the Rules:

1) Write a whole paragraph ( a paragraph sounds easy right?) without any word containing the letter “e” (still easy?)
2) By reading this you are already signed up.
3) Challenge at least five bloggers to do the challenge. They must do it within 24 hours or it is considered as failure.
4) If you fail or pass, suffer in the Page of Lame.
5) If you win, wallow in the Page of Fame.
6) Link to the Allergic to ‘E’ Challenge page.

Here’s my paragraph:

What an odd task: a paragraph without that curling symbol found so commonly in writing. I try, and try again, dismissing words as I go. This is a tricky task! So many words contain that dastardly swirl. My digits twitch, willing to input information, but caught within such limiting constraints, my thoughts fail to flow. Frustration grows; a roiling mass – no, no, no! Not that, or that… Aargh! Slowly, painstakingly words skulk into position until, finally, I’m through.

My nominees are:

Priceless Joy

Shivangi

Tastyniblets

Naturally Dreamy

Ad Dawg

I’ve also just discovered that this is my 200th post, so ‘yay!’ 🙂

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Blog Tour Award

I’ve been nominated by Francesca over at A Smith’s World to take part in the Blog Tour Award. I was also nominated by Yinglan at A Simple Life a few weeks ago but unfortunately didn’t spot it until too late to participate. A big ‘thank you’ to both of you for thinking of me.blog tour award

The Rules:

  • Compose a one-time post on a specific Monday (date given from your nomination – I was given April 20th)
  • Give them the rules and a specific Monday to post by. On this occasion, next Monday will be Monday, 27th April so I am going to ask that my nominees post on that date.
  • Pass the tour on up to four other bloggers.
  • Answer four questions about your creative process which lets other bloggers and visitors know what inspires you to do what you do.

The Questions:

What are you working on at the moment?

If you include the flash fic’s that have grown into potential novels, the poetry collection and the short story anthology that I’m trying to put together, I’m working on so many different things its difficult to keep track of them all! There are two main things I’m supposed to be focussing on, however: my Enchanted Forest children’s stories and Wildwood. I’ve talked about and shared my children’s stories on here a few times now so today I’m going to talk about Wildwood. This is a series of books that I’ve been working on for a very long time, though it’s changed hugely over the years, and is such a mammoth project that I often wonder whether ‘I’ve bitten off more than I can chew’. It spans thousands of years, from neolithic times (approx. 4000BC) through to the modern day Britain and involves time travel and a lot of weirdness.

How does your work differ from others in your genre?

Hopefully through the two central characters. Wildwood is a mix of fantasy and historical but the characters are a little different to most you find in these genres. One experiences time slower than other people; the other experiences it faster. The first is generally seen as being a genius as he has more time to process things, the other is thought of as slow and simple. The way they see and interact with the world gives interesting viewpoints. Hopefully. I’m also hoping that the folklore elements add a different twist…

Why do you write or create what you do?

I love writing and creating stories. I couldn’t not do it. The ideas come into my head and I just have to explore them and see where they’ll lead.

How does your writing/creative process work?

I always write first in a notepad, usually when I’m alone. The words flow better when I’m in solitude. I then type up and edit whatever I’ve written. I don’t usually write chronologically – especially not Wildwood. With the story spanning such a huge amount of time and with time travel involved, I want it all to fit together. I’ll often follow a thematic thread and write a number of linked scenes from across the series. Even within a chapter I’ll write scenes from all over the place and then put them together like a jigsaw. Once I have them in the right order I’ll write through them, linking them together and editing as I go.

My Nominees: 

The Dune Mouse aka Cybele Moon

Sonya

Lyn

Richard Ankers

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: 2015 #Week 1 – Beast

dusty tractor

It moves like a great beast: slow and steady as it trundles along lanes dry and dusty after the weeks of summer drought. I watch it pass, see the sun glinting on dirty paintwork, and I try not to choke on the clouds of dust disturbed by its passage. Soon it has gone and only the faint haze in the air and the distant grumble of motor speaks of its presence. But it is not alone in its endeavour. Following behind are more, their trailers overflowing with harvested crops, moving in a straggling herd from fields to farm yard. And soon they return. All day long they journey, back and forth in relays of unrelenting industry.


This post is for Cee’s Which Way photo challenge. To find out more or to see other entries go here.

100913-bw-11featured blogger

 

I feel incredibly honoured to have been chosen as one of Cee’s featured bloggers for this week. Thank you, Cee.

To Walk Among The Grave Stones

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I have always loved walking around graveyards. Now, your first reaction to this may be to think how very morbid, but whilst there may be a slight element of this, it is not really the case. Growing up in the middle of a busy town, one of the few places where we could go for walks away from the traffic and the monotonous sights of man-made structures, was the sprawling, tree-filled expanse of the nearby Polish War Cemetery.

When I was very small it was just a safe place to burn off excess energy – as long as we didn’t run over the graves or disturb any mourners (this respect was always drummed into us). As I grew older, however, I began to look at the gravestones themselves and I began to wonder about the people buried there.

I now live in a village with only a small graveyard around the church, but I still like to wander among the graves, read the worn writing and wonder.

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Who were they?
What did they do during their lives?
Who did they love?
Who did they hate?
Who mourned at their passing?
Who celebrated their lives?

All I ever have are unanswered questions and my own imaginings, but I am happy with this. Maybe someday I’ll look into some of the names I find on the stones – the historian side of me whispers of local archives and family histories – but I think that if I ever start to look into any family history, I probably ought to make it my own!

Bye-de-byes.